PROJECT 7: WISDOM

- EXPLAIN PAIN -
David Butler & Lorimer Moseley

Chronic Pain is defined as pain that lasts six months or longer

We have all experienced injury, or acute pain. Acute pain is the type of pain you experience if you drop a hammer on your toe or burn your hand on a curling iron. Acute pain starts suddenly and doesn’t last long. Acute pain is good - it lets you know that you have injured yourself. It tells you to stop doing what you are doing. 

Beyond the duration of pain, chronic pain varries from acute pain in several ways. It can be said that with chronic pain “the pain itself becomes the disease.” Chronic pain creates a chain reaction that alters multiple systems of the body. Some of these reactions affect the mental and emotional functioning of an indivudual including:
Depression
Anxiety
Hopelessness
Fear
Irrability
Stress
Fatigue
Sleeplessness

Chronic pain also effects the physical body in several ways including:
Inflamation
Nerve Damage/Pain
Compartmental Syndrome
Digestion Difficulty
Supressed Immune Activity
Increased sensitivity to stimuli 

And if that wasn’t enough, chronic pain also begins to dominate every aspect of day-to-day life including:
Work
Friendships
Family Life
Hobbies
Thoughts
Sports
Emotions
Devotions
Beliefs 

With this information, we can begin to understand how working with a client experiencing chronic pain is different than working with a client in acute pain. From here, it is important to create a strong foundation in working with a client in chronic pain. Consider the following when creating a foundation of understanding. 


SETTING A FOUNDATION: WORKING WITH A CLIENT EXPERIENCING CHRONIC PAIN

1. Pain Path

2. PANAS-SF

3. Coping Strategy

4. Pain Relationship

5. Triggers


With this holistic approach to chronic pain, you will be better able to assist a client experiencing this wide-reaching discomfort. From here, specific exercises/practices can be implemented in a way that will best serve the client.